On a much warmer and less snowy day, the Consortium Members met for our Spring Workshop. The morning kicked off with the participants revisiting the pedagogical merits of Reciprocal Teaching. Reciprocal teaching refers to an instructional activity in which students become the teacher in small group reading sessions.

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Teachers model, then help students learn to guide group discussions using four strategies: summarizing, question generating, clarifying, and predicting. RT is a method that can be used at any school age in almost any subject. This instructional activity can be gradually released to increase student metacognition. Consortium Members had another go at trying this method out. Conversations ensued around how to modify RT for our ELL, Special Needs and gifted/talented students. Each member was able to work with their grade level group to develop an action. Consortium Members ended the morning feeling energized with something very tangible to bring back to students.

Following Reciprocal Teaching, Consortium Members worked with Ann Mordecai on analyzing common assessments used within schools. Participants determined alignment of assessments or the need to create new.

In the afternoon, educators were able to choose between two breakout sessions. William Preble took the afternoon to shine light on the importance of school climate and culture. Participants were able to take part in hands-on activities that could be used in classrooms/schools. Carissa Carrow presented the third part of a three-part presentation on Quality Performance Assessments. Participants brought student work to calibrate the assessment of student work.

After a day of much thought and hard-work, Consortium Members left refreshed and ready to put thought into action!

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Sarah Galligher presented on Reciprocal Teaching.

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Bill Preble, School Culture and Climate Expert